Architecture and Design in Japan

House in Miyamoto, Osaka Designed by Tato Architects Named 2018 House of the Year

An ingenious open-concept house called the “House in Miyamoto” has been named 2018’s House of the Year by Dezeen, an international architecture and design magazine. The house, located in Osaka, was designed by Kobe-based Tato Architects’s Yo Shimada, who created a layout in which the entire interior is a single room divided into functional spaces and thirteen mini-levels connected by floating angular platform stairs.

What the clients wanted

As the architects explain, the home was designed for a family of three and their many belongings. The family members wanted to feel close to each other, regardless of where they happened to be in the house. They also didn’t want private rooms or storage rooms because they didn’t want to tuck things away.

House in Miyamoto by Tato Architects. Photo: Shinkenchiku Sha

The Design

To find a form that would allow the house to feel like one room while while creating enough storage space for the family’s belongings, the architects proposed a design in which the interior, which has a ceiling height equivalent to a two-story building, would be connected by thirteen different levels with a height different of 700-mm (about 27.5-inches). This also allows the different levels to be used as tables and shelves.

House in Miyamoto by Tato Architects. Photo: Shinkenchiku Sha

The floors build up as two spiral shapes, joining at the living room, and then separate into two again before arriving at the rooftop deck.

House in Miyamoto by Tato Architects. Photo: Shinkenchiku Sha

By using this combination of two spirals, the architects were able to create multiple paths inside the house and to allow for different room compartments, changes in circulation and the clients’ lifestyle.

House in Miyamoto by Tato Architects. Photo: Shinkenchiku Sha

The flag-shaped building site is surrounded by parking lots and apartments and it was assumed that more tall buildings would be built nearby in the future. Also, because the only surface that was expected to receive sunlight would be the roof, the architects placed the windows uniformly around the rectangular box-shaped structure and inserted triangular terraces to maximize the amount of natural light.

House in Miyamoto by Tato Architects. Photo: Shinkenchiku Sha

House in Miyamoto by Tato Architects. Photo: Shinkenchiku Sha

House in Miyamoto by Tato Architects. Photo: Shinkenchiku Sha

Because the house is located in a fire prevention district, it was designed with a steel framework with a ceiling height of 6.9-meters, with thirteen floating levels. The top seven levels are suspended with 20-mm steel rods from the roof beam, with the bottom six floors supported by 75-mm square steel pipes.

House in Miyamoto by Tato Architects. Photo: Shinkenchiku Sha

House in Miyamoto by Tato Architects. Photo: Shinkenchiku Sha

House in Miyamoto by Tato Architects. Image: Tato Architects

See more photos on: ArchDaily and Dezeen

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